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News — patient safety

Will Emergency Drugs Bite You in the Butt?

Many states require that Dentists (and even staff members) maintain current BLS, ACLS and/or PALS. Additionally, there are requirements that Dentists have and maintain suitable emergency oxygen and have emergency drugs "as a reasonable Dentist with your training and experience."As a State Board Investigator, I investigated patient deaths and hospitalizations. I saw the real life consequences for Dentists who were not prepared for Medical Emergencies in their practice. Not only do you have the legal and administrative hassles, the worst consequence is that you have to live with yourself. Medical Emergencies are real and being prepared is vital. It starts...

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Are You Ready for a Medical Emergency in Your Dental Practice?

911, What's Your Emergency? It is not a matter of ‘if’, but which (and how severe) a medical emergency will occur in your dental office. People, your patients, are sick as they have every been. Even without sedation in the equation you never know when it will be someone’s time to have an emergency. When it occurs in your office you have to be able to competently deal with it to ensure the best patient outcome. In many states, dentists are required to have a written medical emergency plan, written medical emergency policies/procedures/protocols, and medical emergency training for their staff. This...

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Is Your Consent Process Full of BARF?

No matter where you in the U.S. you practice dentistry, there are laws or rules that require you to obtain written, informed consent for treatment from your patients....which is express permission to do what your patients hire you to do for them. Gone are the days when a patients’ voluntary presence in your dental office, in your dental chair, is sufficient as ‘consent’ for treatment.

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You Can't Handle the TRUTH... About N-95 vs. KN-95 Respirator Masks

I don’t understand why you keep telling us we have to implement an OSHA Respiratory Protection Program – we don’t use respirators.
  • The terminology around masks and respirators is the cause of a lot of confusion. You use N-95 masks, which you call “masks”. The N-95 mask is classified by OSHA as Face Filtering Respirators (FFR). As such, N-95 respirator masks are subject to the requirements OSHA’s Respiratory Protection standard (1910.134).

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